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City of Grandview Heights Blog


Mar 20

The Tuesday Top 5: March 19th, 2019

Posted on March 20, 2019 at 12:18 PM by Laura Oldham


Welcome to the Tuesday Top 5! Your source for the latest info on what is going on in Grandview Heights
                                                                                                      
1. Community Planning Documents Posted Ahead of March 26th Meeting

The administration has posted the final working draft documents tied to the City’s Growing on Tradition community planning efforts and the Spaces and Places study online ahead of a formal March 26th public unveiling and discussion.

The Growing with Traditions documents filed March 13 culminate both public sessions and committee meetings on land use issues, transportation and connectivity, and economic health.  The Spaces and Places Plan looks at public spaces and planning of city & community facilities.

The City and its consultants will host a community meeting March 26th at 6 p.m. in the Middle School Commons to accept public feedback as the plans move towards completion.

I would like to encourage residents to read the draft plans this week and provide feedback to prior to the meeting.

Grandview Plan side 3.19 

Grandview plan 4 3.19

Grandview plan 2 3.19


To provide feedback, please go online to fill out the feedback forms. These comments will help our consultants plan their presentations.

first wrote in mid-December about an emerging consensus among the Public Spaces & Places Steering Committee members to relocate City Hall and the divisions of Police and Fire to the Grandview Center site at Grandview Avenue and Goodale Boulevard when the Service Center complex moves to McKinley Ave. The panel also favors keeping the remaining City property in that area as a green corridor entrance to the City 

2. State of the City: Community Getting Stronger

I want to follow up my March 12th State of the City address with some observations for those unable to attend.

What a difference 10 years of re-development have made since the City and the Grandview Heights Board of Education completed the first economic development agreement with Grandview Yard developer Nationwide Realty Investors.

The attraction of Nationwide Insurance’s corporate campus five years ago has anchored the 100-acre development in the City’s former industrial district while creating financial stability for the City with 5,200 workers now employed between West Third Avenue and Goodale Boulevard east of Northwest Boulevard.  Income tax revenue from that area has increased from a couple of hundred thousand dollars a year to almost $8,000,000. About 45% of the income tax goes into our general fund.  The remaining amount is used to pay public improvement bonds and first occupancy job incentives. Over the next 20 years the incentives will be reduced to zero and that money will go to the retirement of bonds.  The public improvement bonds are projected to be paid off in 2040.
The City expects the market-value of Grandview Yard projects to hit $400 million in 2020, a staggering 300 percent increase from the $100 million in market value set in 2015.  Construction in the area will continue for at least the next five years.


Building permits tell a story of strength as well. Contractors pulled 675 residential permits in 2018 – a number that includes new construction and renovation projects of existing homes – and 340 commercial permits, a number that includes permits for multi-family projects of four units or more. The combined 1,015 permits represent a record number for our 112-year-old community.

Rather than repeating the whole presentation, I would invite you to watch and listen to the State of the City presentation on YouTube at your convenience. Feel welcome to contact me if you have any comments or questions.

3. Grandview Yard TIF Financial Shift Detailed

I strongly believe the creation of the Grandview Yard has certainly had a positive economic and social impact on the City. It has allowed the City, in the last 14 years, to go from economically distressed to financially strong with a AAA credit rating. 

In January, I posted information about how Grandview Yard had generated 41 percent of the withholding taxes collected in our City in 2018 and that will increase to 50% in 2019.  In early February I wrote how the extension of the Grandview Yard zoning to the blighted industrial properties south of Goodale Boulevard also created an opportunity to clean up the brownfield, invest in infrastructure, improve traffic flow in the area and more than double the cash flow from the Yard to the Grandview Heights City School District.

Perhaps the most significant financial charts I showed at the State of the City, in fact, showed the monumental impact of the rescheduling the payback of the TIF bonds will have on the school finances.

Grandview Yard - School 3.19

Under the 2009 school compensation agreement, the district would expect $59.7 million from 2019 through 2040, a 22-year period. Under the revised agreement, that amount swells to an estimated $143.9 million. 

That marks a $84.2 million combined increase during that same period, or a 141 percent increase in revenue headed to the schools.

That increase will cut in half the amount taxpayers in Grandview Heights and Marble Cliff will pay in property taxes to pay off the school construction bond levy approved in November.

4. West Jeff Veteran Joins Division of Fire

The Grandview Heights Division of Fire has hired a new firefighter/paramedic recently.
Adam Goudy, 33, joined the force March 11th after 6 ½ years with the Jefferson Township Fire Department in West Jefferson. Goudy had previous worked part-time stints at the Pleasant Township and Orange Township fire departments in the region.

20190317_145234

He lives with his wife and son in Hilliard.

The Grandview Heights fire division has one more firefighter/paramedic vacancy ahead of a Civil Service Commission test to determine which of six eligible division veterans will permanently fill the shift captaincy that opened up March 1st with the retirement of Capt. Michael Shimko on March 1st.

5. Chamber Retires DigFest after Eight Years 

The Tri-Village Chamber Partnership-sponsored Drinking-In-Grandview Festival (DiG Fest) that was held in Grandview Yard in mid-June the last several years will not have a ninth round this year.
The merchant association’s board formally announced the news during their March 14th annual meeting luncheon.

The Fest at First Avenue Park within Grandview Yard began as a way to promote the fledgling craft brewing and distillery industries. Several breweries and handful of breweries are located in and around the City and nearby Short North and Downtown Columbus locations, so the Yard made for a great spot. 

But the Chamber board reported putting on the festival has always presented challenges, including the staffing a sufficient number of volunteers required to pull off the event of that size and the unpredictability of the weather for the one-day fundraiser. Competition from other regional events that same summer weekend in recent has made attendance and income inconsistent.

Tuesday Top 5 is a weekly update from Mayor Ray DeGraw and the City of Grandview Heights. For more information, visit GrandviewHeights.org. 

Sign up here to get text or email alerts with the latest news from the City of Grandview Heights: https://www.grandviewheights.org/list.aspx?ListID=261

 The Tuesday Top 5: March 12, 2019

Welcome to the Tuesday Top 5! Your source for the latest info on what is going on in Grandview Heights

1.City begins Safe Routes to School Projects

The Grandview Heights Service Department will begin several projects this week to make walking and riding bicycles to school safer before the start of the 2019-2020 school year.

20190219_145807(0)

The projects slated during the next few weeks consist of:

1.    Share the road bike markings on West First Avenue from Cambridge Boulevard to Virginia Avenue; 

2.    Installing flashing school zone lights on West First just east of Virginia Ave on eastbound side of First and east of Oxley on the westbound side.  

3.    Installing flashing crosswalk lights over West First at Virginia; and 

4.    Installing flashing lights on Oxley just north of Robert Louis Stevenson Elementary between Hilo Lane and Parkway Drive.

5.    Bike rake at the middle school.

The City had identified these projects several years ago in hopes of gaining some federal Safe Routes to School funding. That funding just came through in recent months.

The expectation is these projects will help improve driver awareness and improve safety at Stevenson. I wrote about just a few weeks ago.    


2. Grandview Crossing Cleared for Redevelopment

The City could see the first projects emerge from the former Kaplin landfill that once stretched along Dublin Road from Grandview Avenue to Columbus’ water treatment plan by spring 2020, after key Grandview Heights City Council votes on March 4th.

I am pleased to report Council approved, in a 6-0 vote, the Community Reinvestment Area legislation necessary to offer developer Wagenbrenner Development and its Gallas Zadeh Development partners a 50 percent, 15-year tax abatement on the planned residential, office and hotel projects. It also approved non-school tax incremental financing legislation for planned public improvements as an incentive for their investment into the Grandview Heights portion of the development.

Wagenbrenner Development expects to begin underground utility work this spring as weather permits. The first projects built on the 15.9 acres in the City and additional 37 acres located in Columbus will likely a parking garage along the rail lines marketing the northern boundary of Grandview Crossing as well as the first of the residential buildings planned throughout the development site.

The portion of the project inside Grandview Heights will feature 50,000 square feet of office and 50,000 square feet of retail, a 200-key hotel and a rental housing project of 250 units geared toward seniors.

In January the Council approved the rezoning of the Grandview section of the project from light industrial to Planned Unit Development zoning that permits a mix of uses. It also approved the City entering into an economic development agreement with the developers at that time.

3. Kaplin Landfill Redevelopment Decades in the Making

I wanted to offer bit more perspective on the Grandview Crossing site that has taken so long to become a community asset.

20190104_160919

That stretch of land from the site of the demolished Knights Inn to the regional water plant became a landfill after years as a quarry operation. The landfill closed in 1967 after accepting the last loads of solid waste and construction debris. Weeds and trees grew on the landfill for more than 50 years.

Continental Real Estate Cos. briefly considered an office and retail project there in the early 2000s. After that effort failed, the Toledo family trust that owned the property decided in 2002 to put the property up for sale.

A second developer, Bear Creek Capital, a few years later, planned a Walmart Supercenter- or Home Depot-anchored retail development on the site, but legal issues overshadowing an environmental consultant tied to the project in late 2006, combined with signs of a softening retail development market ahead of the 2008-2009 recession, scuttled that prospect Bear Creek had dubbed Grandview Station.

Wagenbrenner became interested in the site in late 2011 as ripe for mixed-use development as it obtained state funding for cleaning up the site. By 2016, it had switched its focus to construction to a 350,000-square-foot retail project, but the shrinking demand for brick-and-mortar retail space again prompted a retreat to a mixed-use project.

This project, which is mostly office and residential based promises to improve the southern gateway into our community and provide, in addition to office and residential, retail, a park and entertainment options as well employment opportunities for residents.

4. City Plans 2019 Road Repairs

The City service department has received three bids for the repaving of several streets and alleyways as part of its 2019 streets program.

Bids were open on March 7th.

The bids from Strawser Paving Co., Columbus Asphalt Paving Inc.  and Decker Construction ranged from $637,857 to $685,391, or well below the engineer’s estimate of $750,000.
The road sections slated for repaving in 2019 are:
  • Glendale Avenue between Mulford Avenue and Second Avenue;
  • Mulford between Grandview Avenue and Glendale
  • Timberman Road between Burr Avenue and Mulford;
  • Elwood Avenue between Goodale and Bluff Avenue; and
  • Westwood Avenue between First and Bluff.
Section of alleys slated for work this year are:
  • Between Thomas Ave. and Oxley Road just south of Mulford;
  • Between Thomas and Oxley just north of Goodale;
  • Between Glendale and Avondale between West First and Haines avenues; 
  • Between Glenn and Westwood avenues just south of Third Avenue; and
  • The intersection of alleys between Elmwood and Westwood just north of First.

The projects as part of the recent bids also include widening the pavement for pedestrians and bicycles along the east edge of Grandview Avenue between Goodale and City Hall.

City Council, during its March 4th meeting, voted 6-0 to authorize Service Department spending up to $100,000 for full-depth spot paving projects to fix potholes and sections of crumbling pavement created during this winter’s unexpectedly damaging freeze-and-thaw weather events this year. 
The recent bids include contingency rates for these repairs.

5. Celebrate Spring with the Leprechaun Scavenger Hunt this Saturday

The Grandview Heights Parks and Recreation Department will host a St. Patrick’s Day themed Leprechaun Hunt on Saturday, March 16 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

lep sa

The fun begins at the Wyman Woods shelter house where participants will get their first clue as they visit various local businesses. Each business will offer goodies and have an activity for those on the hunt to complete before using that clue to find the next location.

There is a 150-person limit so if you haven’t already registered, visit the website or contact Taylor Lindsey at 614-481-6202 or tlindsey@grandviewheights.org 

Special thanks to the program’s sponsors: the Grandview Heights Public Library, Primrose Grandview, Cub Shrub, Great Clips, Peabody Papers, Doggie Day Spa and Capital City Gardens.

 

Tuesday Top 5 is a weekly update from Mayor Ray DeGraw and the City of Grandview Heights. For more information, visit GrandviewHeights.org. 

Sign up here to get text or email alerts with the latest news from the City of Grandview Heights: https://www.grandviewheights.org/list.aspx?ListID=261

 The Tuesday Top 5: March 12, 2019

Welcome to the Tuesday Top 5! Your source for the latest info on what is going on in Grandview Heights

1.City begins Safe Routes to School Projects

The Grandview Heights Service Department will begin several projects this week to make walking and riding bicycles to school safer before the start of the 2019-2020 school year.

20190219_145807(0)

The projects slated during the next few weeks consist of:

1.    Share the road bike markings on West First Avenue from Cambridge Boulevard to Virginia Avenue; 

2.    Installing flashing school zone lights on West First just east of Virginia Ave on eastbound side of First and east of Oxley on the westbound side.  

3.    Installing flashing crosswalk lights over West First at Virginia; and 

4.    Installing flashing lights on Oxley just north of Robert Louis Stevenson Elementary between Hilo Lane and Parkway Drive.

5.    Bike rake at the middle school.

The City had identified these projects several years ago in hopes of gaining some federal Safe Routes to School funding. That funding just came through in recent months.

The expectation is these projects will help improve driver awareness and improve safety at Stevenson. I wrote about just a few weeks ago.    


2. Grandview Crossing Cleared for Redevelopment

The City could see the first projects emerge from the former Kaplin landfill that once stretched along Dublin Road from Grandview Avenue to Columbus’ water treatment plan by spring 2020, after key Grandview Heights City Council votes on March 4th.

I am pleased to report Council approved, in a 6-0 vote, the Community Reinvestment Area legislation necessary to offer developer Wagenbrenner Development and its Gallas Zadeh Development partners a 50 percent, 15-year tax abatement on the planned residential, office and hotel projects. It also approved non-school tax incremental financing legislation for planned public improvements as an incentive for their investment into the Grandview Heights portion of the development.

Wagenbrenner Development expects to begin underground utility work this spring as weather permits. The first projects built on the 15.9 acres in the City and additional 37 acres located in Columbus will likely a parking garage along the rail lines marketing the northern boundary of Grandview Crossing as well as the first of the residential buildings planned throughout the development site.

The portion of the project inside Grandview Heights will feature 50,000 square feet of office and 50,000 square feet of retail, a 200-key hotel and a rental housing project of 250 units geared toward seniors.

In January the Council approved the rezoning of the Grandview section of the project from light industrial to Planned Unit Development zoning that permits a mix of uses. It also approved the City entering into an economic development agreement with the developers at that time.

3. Kaplin Landfill Redevelopment Decades in the Making

I wanted to offer bit more perspective on the Grandview Crossing site that has taken so long to become a community asset.

20190104_160919

That stretch of land from the site of the demolished Knights Inn to the regional water plant became a landfill after years as a quarry operation. The landfill closed in 1967 after accepting the last loads of solid waste and construction debris. Weeds and trees grew on the landfill for more than 50 years.

Continental Real Estate Cos. briefly considered an office and retail project there in the early 2000s. After that effort failed, the Toledo family trust that owned the property decided in 2002 to put the property up for sale.

A second developer, Bear Creek Capital, a few years later, planned a Walmart Supercenter- or Home Depot-anchored retail development on the site, but legal issues overshadowing an environmental consultant tied to the project in late 2006, combined with signs of a softening retail development market ahead of the 2008-2009 recession, scuttled that prospect Bear Creek had dubbed Grandview Station.

Wagenbrenner became interested in the site in late 2011 as ripe for mixed-use development as it obtained state funding for cleaning up the site. By 2016, it had switched its focus to construction to a 350,000-square-foot retail project, but the shrinking demand for brick-and-mortar retail space again prompted a retreat to a mixed-use project.

This project, which is mostly office and residential based promises to improve the southern gateway into our community and provide, in addition to office and residential, retail, a park and entertainment options as well employment opportunities for residents.

4. City Plans 2019 Road Repairs

The City service department has received three bids for the repaving of several streets and alleyways as part of its 2019 streets program.

Bids were open on March 7th.

The bids from Strawser Paving Co., Columbus Asphalt Paving Inc.  and Decker Construction ranged from $637,857 to $685,391, or well below the engineer’s estimate of $750,000.
The road sections slated for repaving in 2019 are:
  • Glendale Avenue between Mulford Avenue and Second Avenue;
  • Mulford between Grandview Avenue and Glendale
  • Timberman Road between Burr Avenue and Mulford;
  • Elwood Avenue between Goodale and Bluff Avenue; and
  • Westwood Avenue between First and Bluff.
Section of alleys slated for work this year are:
  • Between Thomas Ave. and Oxley Road just south of Mulford;
  • Between Thomas and Oxley just north of Goodale;
  • Between Glendale and Avondale between West First and Haines avenues; 
  • Between Glenn and Westwood avenues just south of Third Avenue; and
  • The intersection of alleys between Elmwood and Westwood just north of First.

The projects as part of the recent bids also include widening the pavement for pedestrians and bicycles along the east edge of Grandview Avenue between Goodale and City Hall.

City Council, during its March 4th meeting, voted 6-0 to authorize Service Department spending up to $100,000 for full-depth spot paving projects to fix potholes and sections of crumbling pavement created during this winter’s unexpectedly damaging freeze-and-thaw weather events this year. 
The recent bids include contingency rates for these repairs.

5. Celebrate Spring with the Leprechaun Scavenger Hunt this Saturday

The Grandview Heights Parks and Recreation Department will host a St. Patrick’s Day themed Leprechaun Hunt on Saturday, March 16 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

lep sa

The fun begins at the Wyman Woods shelter house where participants will get their first clue as they visit various local businesses. Each business will offer goodies and have an activity for those on the hunt to complete before using that clue to find the next location.

There is a 150-person limit so if you haven’t already registered, visit the website or contact Taylor Lindsey at 614-481-6202 or tlindsey@grandviewheights.org 

Special thanks to the program’s sponsors: the Grandview Heights Public Library, Primrose Grandview, Cub Shrub, Great Clips, Peabody Papers, Doggie Day Spa and Capital City Gardens.

 

Tuesday Top 5 is a weekly update from Mayor Ray DeGraw and the City of Grandview Heights. For more information, visit GrandviewHeights.org. 

Sign up here to get text or email alerts with the latest news from the City of Grandview Heights: https://www.grandviewheights.org/list.aspx?ListID=261

 The Tuesday Top 5: March 12, 2019

Welcome to the Tuesday Top 5! Your source for the latest info on what is going on in Grandview Heights

1.City begins Safe Routes to School Projects

The Grandview Heights Service Department will begin several projects this week to make walking and riding bicycles to school safer before the start of the 2019-2020 school year.

20190219_145807(0)

The projects slated during the next few weeks consist of:

1.    Share the road bike markings on West First Avenue from Cambridge Boulevard to Virginia Avenue; 

2.    Installing flashing school zone lights on West First just east of Virginia Ave on eastbound side of First and east of Oxley on the westbound side.  

3.    Installing flashing crosswalk lights over West First at Virginia; and 

4.    Installing flashing lights on Oxley just north of Robert Louis Stevenson Elementary between Hilo Lane and Parkway Drive.

5.    Bike rake at the middle school.

The City had identified these projects several years ago in hopes of gaining some federal Safe Routes to School funding. That funding just came through in recent months.

The expectation is these projects will help improve driver awareness and improve safety at Stevenson. I wrote about just a few weeks ago.    


2. Grandview Crossing Cleared for Redevelopment

The City could see the first projects emerge from the former Kaplin landfill that once stretched along Dublin Road from Grandview Avenue to Columbus’ water treatment plan by spring 2020, after key Grandview Heights City Council votes on March 4th.

I am pleased to report Council approved, in a 6-0 vote, the Community Reinvestment Area legislation necessary to offer developer Wagenbrenner Development and its Gallas Zadeh Development partners a 50 percent, 15-year tax abatement on the planned residential, office and hotel projects. It also approved non-school tax incremental financing legislation for planned public improvements as an incentive for their investment into the Grandview Heights portion of the development.

Wagenbrenner Development expects to begin underground utility work this spring as weather permits. The first projects built on the 15.9 acres in the City and additional 37 acres located in Columbus will likely a parking garage along the rail lines marketing the northern boundary of Grandview Crossing as well as the first of the residential buildings planned throughout the development site.

The portion of the project inside Grandview Heights will feature 50,000 square feet of office and 50,000 square feet of retail, a 200-key hotel and a rental housing project of 250 units geared toward seniors.

In January the Council approved the rezoning of the Grandview section of the project from light industrial to Planned Unit Development zoning that permits a mix of uses. It also approved the City entering into an economic development agreement with the developers at that time.

3. Kaplin Landfill Redevelopment Decades in the Making

I wanted to offer bit more perspective on the Grandview Crossing site that has taken so long to become a community asset.

20190104_160919

That stretch of land from the site of the demolished Knights Inn to the regional water plant became a landfill after years as a quarry operation. The landfill closed in 1967 after accepting the last loads of solid waste and construction debris. Weeds and trees grew on the landfill for more than 50 years.

Continental Real Estate Cos. briefly considered an office and retail project there in the early 2000s. After that effort failed, the Toledo family trust that owned the property decided in 2002 to put the property up for sale.

A second developer, Bear Creek Capital, a few years later, planned a Walmart Supercenter- or Home Depot-anchored retail development on the site, but legal issues overshadowing an environmental consultant tied to the project in late 2006, combined with signs of a softening retail development market ahead of the 2008-2009 recession, scuttled that prospect Bear Creek had dubbed Grandview Station.

Wagenbrenner became interested in the site in late 2011 as ripe for mixed-use development as it obtained state funding for cleaning up the site. By 2016, it had switched its focus to construction to a 350,000-square-foot retail project, but the shrinking demand for brick-and-mortar retail space again prompted a retreat to a mixed-use project.

This project, which is mostly office and residential based promises to improve the southern gateway into our community and provide, in addition to office and residential, retail, a park and entertainment options as well employment opportunities for residents.

4. City Plans 2019 Road Repairs

The City service department has received three bids for the repaving of several streets and alleyways as part of its 2019 streets program.

Bids were open on March 7th.

The bids from Strawser Paving Co., Columbus Asphalt Paving Inc.  and Decker Construction ranged from $637,857 to $685,391, or well below the engineer’s estimate of $750,000.
The road sections slated for repaving in 2019 are:
  • Glendale Avenue between Mulford Avenue and Second Avenue;
  • Mulford between Grandview Avenue and Glendale
  • Timberman Road between Burr Avenue and Mulford;
  • Elwood Avenue between Goodale and Bluff Avenue; and
  • Westwood Avenue between First and Bluff.
Section of alleys slated for work this year are:
  • Between Thomas Ave. and Oxley Road just south of Mulford;
  • Between Thomas and Oxley just north of Goodale;
  • Between Glendale and Avondale between West First and Haines avenues; 
  • Between Glenn and Westwood avenues just south of Third Avenue; and
  • The intersection of alleys between Elmwood and Westwood just north of First.

The projects as part of the recent bids also include widening the pavement for pedestrians and bicycles along the east edge of Grandview Avenue between Goodale and City Hall.

City Council, during its March 4th meeting, voted 6-0 to authorize Service Department spending up to $100,000 for full-depth spot paving projects to fix potholes and sections of crumbling pavement created during this winter’s unexpectedly damaging freeze-and-thaw weather events this year. 
The recent bids include contingency rates for these repairs.

5. Celebrate Spring with the Leprechaun Scavenger Hunt this Saturday

The Grandview Heights Parks and Recreation Department will host a St. Patrick’s Day themed Leprechaun Hunt on Saturday, March 16 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

lep sa

The fun begins at the Wyman Woods shelter house where participants will get their first clue as they visit various local businesses. Each business will offer goodies and have an activity for those on the hunt to complete before using that clue to find the next location.

There is a 150-person limit so if you haven’t already registered, visit the website or contact Taylor Lindsey at 614-481-6202 or tlindsey@grandviewheights.org 

Special thanks to the program’s sponsors: the Grandview Heights Public Library, Primrose Grandview, Cub Shrub, Great Clips, Peabody Papers, Doggie Day Spa and Capital City Gardens.

 

Tuesday Top 5 is a weekly update from Mayor Ray DeGraw and the City of Grandview Heights. For more information, visit GrandviewHeights.org. 

Sign up here to get text or email alerts with the latest news from the City of Grandview Heights: https://www.grandviewheights.org/list.aspx?ListID=261
 The Tuesday Top 5: March 12, 2019
 The Tuesday Top 5: March 19th, 2019

Welcome to the Tuesday Top 5! Your source for the latest info on what is going on in Grandview Heights
                                                                                                      
1. Community Planning Documents Posted Ahead of March 26th Meeting

The administration has posted the final working draft documents tied to the City’s Growing on Tradition community planning efforts and the Spaces and Places study online ahead of a formal March 26th public unveiling and discussion.

The Growing with Traditions documents filed March 13 culminate both public sessions and committee meetings on land use issues, transportation and connectivity, and economic health.  The Spaces and Places Plan looks at public spaces and planning of city & community facilities.

The City and its consultants will host a community meeting March 26th at 6 p.m. in the Middle School Commons to accept public feedback as the plans move towards completion.

I would like to encourage residents to read the draft plans this week and provide feedback to prior to the meeting.

Grandview Plan side 3.19 

Grandview plan 4 3.19

Grandview plan 2 3.19


To provide feedback, please go online to fill out the feedback forms. These comments will help our consultants plan their presentations.

first wrote in mid-December about an emerging consensus among the Public Spaces & Places Steering Committee members to relocate City Hall and the divisions of Police and Fire to the Grandview Center site at Grandview Avenue and Goodale Boulevard when the Service Center complex moves to McKinley Ave. The panel also favors keeping the remaining City property in that area as a green corridor entrance to the City 

2. State of the City: Community Getting Stronger

I want to follow up my March 12th State of the City address with some observations for those unable to attend.

What a difference 10 years of re-development have made since the City and the Grandview Heights Board of Education completed the first economic development agreement with Grandview Yard developer Nationwide Realty Investors.

The attraction of Nationwide Insurance’s corporate campus five years ago has anchored the 100-acre development in the City’s former industrial district while creating financial stability for the City with 5,200 workers now employed between West Third Avenue and Goodale Boulevard east of Northwest Boulevard.  Income tax revenue from that area has increased from a couple of hundred thousand dollars a year to almost $8,000,000. About 45% of the income tax goes into our general fund.  The remaining amount is used to pay public improvement bonds and first occupancy job incentives. Over the next 20 years the incentives will be reduced to zero and that money will go to the retirement of bonds.  The public improvement bonds are projected to be paid off in 2040.
The City expects the market-value of Grandview Yard projects to hit $400 million in 2020, a staggering 300 percent increase from the $100 million in market value set in 2015.  Construction in the area will continue for at least the next five years.


Building permits tell a story of strength as well. Contractors pulled 675 residential permits in 2018 – a number that includes new construction and renovation projects of existing homes – and 340 commercial permits, a number that includes permits for multi-family projects of four units or more. The combined 1,015 permits represent a record number for our 112-year-old community.

Rather than repeating the whole presentation, I would invite you to watch and listen to the State of the City presentation on YouTube at your convenience. Feel welcome to contact me if you have any comments or questions.

3. Grandview Yard TIF Financial Shift Detailed

I strongly believe the creation of the Grandview Yard has certainly had a positive economic and social impact on the City. It has allowed the City, in the last 14 years, to go from economically distressed to financially strong with a AAA credit rating. 

In January, I posted information about how Grandview Yard had generated 41 percent of the withholding taxes collected in our City in 2018 and that will increase to 50% in 2019.  In early February I wrote how the extension of the Grandview Yard zoning to the blighted industrial properties south of Goodale Boulevard also created an opportunity to clean up the brownfield, invest in infrastructure, improve traffic flow in the area and more than double the cash flow from the Yard to the Grandview Heights City School District.

Perhaps the most significant financial charts I showed at the State of the City, in fact, showed the monumental impact of the rescheduling the payback of the TIF bonds will have on the school finances.

Grandview Yard - School 3.19

Under the 2009 school compensation agreement, the district would expect $59.7 million from 2019 through 2040, a 22-year period. Under the revised agreement, that amount swells to an estimated $143.9 million. 

That marks a $84.2 million combined increase during that same period, or a 141 percent increase in revenue headed to the schools.

That increase will cut in half the amount taxpayers in Grandview Heights and Marble Cliff will pay in property taxes to pay off the school construction bond levy approved in November.

4. West Jeff Veteran Joins Division of Fire

The Grandview Heights Division of Fire has hired a new firefighter/paramedic recently.
Adam Goudy, 33, joined the force March 11th after 6 ½ years with the Jefferson Township Fire Department in West Jefferson. Goudy had previous worked part-time stints at the Pleasant Township and Orange Township fire departments in the region.

20190317_145234

He lives with his wife and son in Hilliard.

The Grandview Heights fire division has one more firefighter/paramedic vacancy ahead of a Civil Service Commission test to determine which of six eligible division veterans will permanently fill the shift captaincy that opened up March 1st with the retirement of Capt. Michael Shimko on March 1st.

5. Chamber Retires DigFest after Eight Years 

The Tri-Village Chamber Partnership-sponsored Drinking-In-Grandview Festival (DiG Fest) that was held in Grandview Yard in mid-June the last several years will not have a ninth round this year.
The merchant association’s board formally announced the news during their March 14th annual meeting luncheon.

The Fest at First Avenue Park within Grandview Yard began as a way to promote the fledgling craft brewing and distillery industries. Several breweries and handful of breweries are located in and around the City and nearby Short North and Downtown Columbus locations, so the Yard made for a great spot. 

But the Chamber board reported putting on the festival has always presented challenges, including the staffing a sufficient number of volunteers required to pull off the event of that size and the unpredictability of the weather for the one-day fundraiser. Competition from other regional events that same summer weekend in recent has made attendance and income inconsistent.

Tuesday Top 5 is a weekly update from Mayor Ray DeGraw and the City of Grandview Heights. For more information, visit GrandviewHeights.org. 

Sign up here to get text or email alerts with the latest news from the City of Grandview Heights: https://www.grandviewheights.org/list.aspx?ListID=261
 The Tuesday Top 5: March 19th, 2019

Welcome to the Tuesday Top 5! Your source for the latest info on what is going on in Grandview Heights
                                                                                                      
1. Community Planning Documents Posted Ahead of March 26th Meeting

The administration has posted the final working draft documents tied to the City’s Growing on Tradition community planning efforts and the Spaces and Places study online ahead of a formal March 26th public unveiling and discussion.

The Growing with Traditions documents filed March 13 culminate both public sessions and committee meetings on land use issues, transportation and connectivity, and economic health.  The Spaces and Places Plan looks at public spaces and planning of city & community facilities.

The City and its consultants will host a community meeting March 26th at 6 p.m. in the Middle School Commons to accept public feedback as the plans move towards completion.

I would like to encourage residents to read the draft plans this week and provide feedback to prior to the meeting.

Grandview Plan side 3.19 

Grandview plan 4 3.19

Grandview plan 2 3.19


To provide feedback, please go online to fill out the feedback forms. These comments will help our consultants plan their presentations.

first wrote in mid-December about an emerging consensus among the Public Spaces & Places Steering Committee members to relocate City Hall and the divisions of Police and Fire to the Grandview Center site at Grandview Avenue and Goodale Boulevard when the Service Center complex moves to McKinley Ave. The panel also favors keeping the remaining City property in that area as a green corridor entrance to the City 

2. State of the City: Community Getting Stronger

I want to follow up my March 12th State of the City address with some observations for those unable to attend.

What a difference 10 years of re-development have made since the City and the Grandview Heights Board of Education completed the first economic development agreement with Grandview Yard developer Nationwide Realty Investors.

The attraction of Nationwide Insurance’s corporate campus five years ago has anchored the 100-acre development in the City’s former industrial district while creating financial stability for the City with 5,200 workers now employed between West Third Avenue and Goodale Boulevard east of Northwest Boulevard.  Income tax revenue from that area has increased from a couple of hundred thousand dollars a year to almost $8,000,000. About 45% of the income tax goes into our general fund.  The remaining amount is used to pay public improvement bonds and first occupancy job incentives. Over the next 20 years the incentives will be reduced to zero and that money will go to the retirement of bonds.  The public improvement bonds are projected to be paid off in 2040.
The City expects the market-value of Grandview Yard projects to hit $400 million in 2020, a staggering 300 percent increase from the $100 million in market value set in 2015.  Construction in the area will continue for at least the next five years.


Building permits tell a story of strength as well. Contractors pulled 675 residential permits in 2018 – a number that includes new construction and renovation projects of existing homes – and 340 commercial permits, a number that includes permits for multi-family projects of four units or more. The combined 1,015 permits represent a record number for our 112-year-old community.

Rather than repeating the whole presentation, I would invite you to watch and listen to the State of the City presentation on YouTube at your convenience. Feel welcome to contact me if you have any comments or questions.

3. Grandview Yard TIF Financial Shift Detailed

I strongly believe the creation of the Grandview Yard has certainly had a positive economic and social impact on the City. It has allowed the City, in the last 14 years, to go from economically distressed to financially strong with a AAA credit rating. 

In January, I posted information about how Grandview Yard had generated 41 percent of the withholding taxes collected in our City in 2018 and that will increase to 50% in 2019.  In early February I wrote how the extension of the Grandview Yard zoning to the blighted industrial properties south of Goodale Boulevard also created an opportunity to clean up the brownfield, invest in infrastructure, improve traffic flow in the area and more than double the cash flow from the Yard to the Grandview Heights City School District.

Perhaps the most significant financial charts I showed at the State of the City, in fact, showed the monumental impact of the rescheduling the payback of the TIF bonds will have on the school finances.

Grandview Yard - School 3.19

Under the 2009 school compensation agreement, the district would expect $59.7 million from 2019 through 2040, a 22-year period. Under the revised agreement, that amount swells to an estimated $143.9 million. 

That marks a $84.2 million combined increase during that same period, or a 141 percent increase in revenue headed to the schools.

That increase will cut in half the amount taxpayers in Grandview Heights and Marble Cliff will pay in property taxes to pay off the school construction bond levy approved in November.

4. West Jeff Veteran Joins Division of Fire

The Grandview Heights Division of Fire has hired a new firefighter/paramedic recently.
Adam Goudy, 33, joined the force March 11th after 6 ½ years with the Jefferson Township Fire Department in West Jefferson. Goudy had previous worked part-time stints at the Pleasant Township and Orange Township fire departments in the region.

20190317_145234

He lives with his wife and son in Hilliard.

The Grandview Heights fire division has one more firefighter/paramedic vacancy ahead of a Civil Service Commission test to determine which of six eligible division veterans will permanently fill the shift captaincy that opened up March 1st with the retirement of Capt. Michael Shimko on March 1st.

5. Chamber Retires DigFest after Eight Years 

The Tri-Village Chamber Partnership-sponsored Drinking-In-Grandview Festival (DiG Fest) that was held in Grandview Yard in mid-June the last several years will not have a ninth round this year.
The merchant association’s board formally announced the news during their March 14th annual meeting luncheon.

The Fest at First Avenue Park within Grandview Yard began as a way to promote the fledgling craft brewing and distillery industries. Several breweries and handful of breweries are located in and around the City and nearby Short North and Downtown Columbus locations, so the Yard made for a great spot. 

But the Chamber board reported putting on the festival has always presented challenges, including the staffing a sufficient number of volunteers required to pull off the event of that size and the unpredictability of the weather for the one-day fundraiser. Competition from other regional events that same summer weekend in recent has made attendance and income inconsistent.

Tuesday Top 5 is a weekly update from Mayor Ray DeGraw and the City of Grandview Heights. For more information, visit GrandviewHeights.org. 

Sign up here to get text or email alerts with the latest news from the City of Grandview Heights: https://www.grandviewheights.org/list.aspx?ListID=261

Continue Reading...

Mar 15

The Tuesday Top 5: March 12th, 2019

Posted on March 15, 2019 at 3:44 PM by Laura Oldham


The Tuesday Top 5: March 12th, 2019

Welcome to the Tuesday Top 5! Your source for the latest info on what is going on in Grandview Heights

1.City begins Safe Routes to School Projects

The Grandview Heights Service Department will begin several projects this week to make walking and riding bicycles to school safer before the start of the 2019-2020 school year.

20190219_145807(0)

The projects slated during the next few weeks consist of:

1.    Share the road bike markings on West First Avenue from Cambridge Boulevard to Virginia Avenue; 

2.    Installing flashing school zone lights on West First just east of Virginia Ave on eastbound side of First and east of Oxley on the westbound side.  

3.    Installing flashing crosswalk lights over West First at Virginia; and 

4.    Installing flashing lights on Oxley just north of Robert Louis Stevenson Elementary between Hilo Lane and Parkway Drive.

5.    Bike rake at the middle school.

The City had identified these projects several years ago in hopes of gaining some federal Safe Routes to School funding. That funding just came through in recent months.

The expectation is these projects will help improve driver awareness and improve safety at Stevenson. I wrote about just a few weeks ago.    


2. Grandview Crossing Cleared for Redevelopment

The City could see the first projects emerge from the former Kaplin landfill that once stretched along Dublin Road from Grandview Avenue to Columbus’ water treatment plan by spring 2020, after key Grandview Heights City Council votes on March 4th.

I am pleased to report Council approved, in a 6-0 vote, the Community Reinvestment Area legislation necessary to offer developer Wagenbrenner Development and its Gallas Zadeh Development partners a 50 percent, 15-year tax abatement on the planned residential, office and hotel projects. It also approved non-school tax incremental financing legislation for planned public improvements as an incentive for their investment into the Grandview Heights portion of the development.

Wagenbrenner Development expects to begin underground utility work this spring as weather permits. The first projects built on the 15.9 acres in the City and additional 37 acres located in Columbus will likely a parking garage along the rail lines marketing the northern boundary of Grandview Crossing as well as the first of the residential buildings planned throughout the development site.

The portion of the project inside Grandview Heights will feature 50,000 square feet of office and 50,000 square feet of retail, a 200-key hotel and a rental housing project of 250 units geared toward seniors.

In January the Council approved the rezoning of the Grandview section of the project from light industrial to Planned Unit Development zoning that permits a mix of uses. It also approved the City entering into an economic development agreement with the developers at that time.

3. Kaplin Landfill Redevelopment Decades in the Making

I wanted to offer bit more perspective on the Grandview Crossing site that has taken so long to become a community asset.

20190104_160919

That stretch of land from the site of the demolished Knights Inn to the regional water plant became a landfill after years as a quarry operation. The landfill closed in 1967 after accepting the last loads of solid waste and construction debris. Weeds and trees grew on the landfill for more than 50 years.

Continental Real Estate Cos. briefly considered an office and retail project there in the early 2000s. After that effort failed, the Toledo family trust that owned the property decided in 2002 to put the property up for sale.

A second developer, Bear Creek Capital, a few years later, planned a Walmart Supercenter- or Home Depot-anchored retail development on the site, but legal issues overshadowing an environmental consultant tied to the project in late 2006, combined with signs of a softening retail development market ahead of the 2008-2009 recession, scuttled that prospect Bear Creek had dubbed Grandview Station.

Wagenbrenner became interested in the site in late 2011 as ripe for mixed-use development as it obtained state funding for cleaning up the site. By 2016, it had switched its focus to construction to a 350,000-square-foot retail project, but the shrinking demand for brick-and-mortar retail space again prompted a retreat to a mixed-use project.

This project, which is mostly office and residential based promises to improve the southern gateway into our community and provide, in addition to office and residential, retail, a park and entertainment options as well employment opportunities for residents.

4. City Plans 2019 Road Repairs

The City service department has received three bids for the repaving of several streets and alleyways as part of its 2019 streets program.

Bids were open on March 7th.

The bids from Strawser Paving Co., Columbus Asphalt Paving Inc.  and Decker Construction ranged from $637,857 to $685,391, or well below the engineer’s estimate of $750,000.
The road sections slated for repaving in 2019 are:
  • Glendale Avenue between Mulford Avenue and Second Avenue;
  • Mulford between Grandview Avenue and Glendale
  • Timberman Road between Burr Avenue and Mulford;
  • Elwood Avenue between Goodale and Bluff Avenue; and
  • Westwood Avenue between First and Bluff.
Section of alleys slated for work this year are:
  • Between Thomas Ave. and Oxley Road just south of Mulford;
  • Between Thomas and Oxley just north of Goodale;
  • Between Glendale and Avondale between West First and Haines avenues; 
  • Between Glenn and Westwood avenues just south of Third Avenue; and
  • The intersection of alleys between Elmwood and Westwood just north of First.

The projects as part of the recent bids also include widening the pavement for pedestrians and bicycles along the east edge of Grandview Avenue between Goodale and City Hall.

City Council, during its March 4th meeting, voted 6-0 to authorize Service Department spending up to $100,000 for full-depth spot paving projects to fix potholes and sections of crumbling pavement created during this winter’s unexpectedly damaging freeze-and-thaw weather events this year. 
The recent bids include contingency rates for these repairs.

5. Celebrate Spring with the Leprechaun Scavenger Hunt this Saturday

The Grandview Heights Parks and Recreation Department will host a St. Patrick’s Day themed Leprechaun Hunt on Saturday, March 16 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

lep sa

The fun begins at the Wyman Woods shelter house where participants will get their first clue as they visit various local businesses. Each business will offer goodies and have an activity for those on the hunt to complete before using that clue to find the next location.

There is a 150-person limit so if you haven’t already registered, visit the website or contact Taylor Lindsey at 614-481-6202 or tlindsey@grandviewheights.org 

Special thanks to the program’s sponsors: the Grandview Heights Public Library, Primrose Grandview, Cub Shrub, Great Clips, Peabody Papers, Doggie Day Spa and Capital City Gardens.

 

Tuesday Top 5 is a weekly update from Mayor Ray DeGraw and the City of Grandview Heights. For more information, visit GrandviewHeights.org. 

Sign up here to get text or email alerts with the latest news from the City of Grandview Heights: https://www.grandviewheights.org/list.aspx?ListID=261



 The Tuesday Top 5: March 12, 2019

Welcome to the Tuesday Top 5! Your source for the latest info on what is going on in Grandview Heights

1.City begins Safe Routes to School Projects

The Grandview Heights Service Department will begin several projects this week to make walking and riding bicycles to school safer before the start of the 2019-2020 school year.

20190219_145807(0)

The projects slated during the next few weeks consist of:

1.    Share the road bike markings on West First Avenue from Cambridge Boulevard to Virginia Avenue; 

2.    Installing flashing school zone lights on West First just east of Virginia Ave on eastbound side of First and east of Oxley on the westbound side.  

3.    Installing flashing crosswalk lights over West First at Virginia; and 

4.    Installing flashing lights on Oxley just north of Robert Louis Stevenson Elementary between Hilo Lane and Parkway Drive.

5.    Bike rake at the middle school.

The City had identified these projects several years ago in hopes of gaining some federal Safe Routes to School funding. That funding just came through in recent months.

The expectation is these projects will help improve driver awareness and improve safety at Stevenson. I wrote about just a few weeks ago.    


2. Grandview Crossing Cleared for Redevelopment

The City could see the first projects emerge from the former Kaplin landfill that once stretched along Dublin Road from Grandview Avenue to Columbus’ water treatment plan by spring 2020, after key Grandview Heights City Council votes on March 4th.

I am pleased to report Council approved, in a 6-0 vote, the Community Reinvestment Area legislation necessary to offer developer Wagenbrenner Development and its Gallas Zadeh Development partners a 50 percent, 15-year tax abatement on the planned residential, office and hotel projects. It also approved non-school tax incremental financing legislation for planned public improvements as an incentive for their investment into the Grandview Heights portion of the development.

Wagenbrenner Development expects to begin underground utility work this spring as weather permits. The first projects built on the 15.9 acres in the City and additional 37 acres located in Columbus will likely a parking garage along the rail lines marketing the northern boundary of Grandview Crossing as well as the first of the residential buildings planned throughout the development site.

The portion of the project inside Grandview Heights will feature 50,000 square feet of office and 50,000 square feet of retail, a 200-key hotel and a rental housing project of 250 units geared toward seniors.

In January the Council approved the rezoning of the Grandview section of the project from light industrial to Planned Unit Development zoning that permits a mix of uses. It also approved the City entering into an economic development agreement with the developers at that time.

3. Kaplin Landfill Redevelopment Decades in the Making

I wanted to offer bit more perspective on the Grandview Crossing site that has taken so long to become a community asset.

20190104_160919

That stretch of land from the site of the demolished Knights Inn to the regional water plant became a landfill after years as a quarry operation. The landfill closed in 1967 after accepting the last loads of solid waste and construction debris. Weeds and trees grew on the landfill for more than 50 years.

Continental Real Estate Cos. briefly considered an office and retail project there in the early 2000s. After that effort failed, the Toledo family trust that owned the property decided in 2002 to put the property up for sale.

A second developer, Bear Creek Capital, a few years later, planned a Walmart Supercenter- or Home Depot-anchored retail development on the site, but legal issues overshadowing an environmental consultant tied to the project in late 2006, combined with signs of a softening retail development market ahead of the 2008-2009 recession, scuttled that prospect Bear Creek had dubbed Grandview Station.

Wagenbrenner became interested in the site in late 2011 as ripe for mixed-use development as it obtained state funding for cleaning up the site. By 2016, it had switched its focus to construction to a 350,000-square-foot retail project, but the shrinking demand for brick-and-mortar retail space again prompted a retreat to a mixed-use project.

This project, which is mostly office and residential based promises to improve the southern gateway into our community and provide, in addition to office and residential, retail, a park and entertainment options as well employment opportunities for residents.

4. City Plans 2019 Road Repairs

The City service department has received three bids for the repaving of several streets and alleyways as part of its 2019 streets program.

Bids were open on March 7th.

The bids from Strawser Paving Co., Columbus Asphalt Paving Inc.  and Decker Construction ranged from $637,857 to $685,391, or well below the engineer’s estimate of $750,000.
The road sections slated for repaving in 2019 are:
  • Glendale Avenue between Mulford Avenue and Second Avenue;
  • Mulford between Grandview Avenue and Glendale
  • Timberman Road between Burr Avenue and Mulford;
  • Elwood Avenue between Goodale and Bluff Avenue; and
  • Westwood Avenue between First and Bluff.
Section of alleys slated for work this year are:
  • Between Thomas Ave. and Oxley Road just south of Mulford;
  • Between Thomas and Oxley just north of Goodale;
  • Between Glendale and Avondale between West First and Haines avenues; 
  • Between Glenn and Westwood avenues just south of Third Avenue; and
  • The intersection of alleys between Elmwood and Westwood just north of First.

The projects as part of the recent bids also include widening the pavement for pedestrians and bicycles along the east edge of Grandview Avenue between Goodale and City Hall.

City Council, during its March 4th meeting, voted 6-0 to authorize Service Department spending up to $100,000 for full-depth spot paving projects to fix potholes and sections of crumbling pavement created during this winter’s unexpectedly damaging freeze-and-thaw weather events this year. 
The recent bids include contingency rates for these repairs.

5. Celebrate Spring with the Leprechaun Scavenger Hunt this Saturday

The Grandview Heights Parks and Recreation Department will host a St. Patrick’s Day themed Leprechaun Hunt on Saturday, March 16 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

lep sa

The fun begins at the Wyman Woods shelter house where participants will get their first clue as they visit various local businesses. Each business will offer goodies and have an activity for those on the hunt to complete before using that clue to find the next location.

There is a 150-person limit so if you haven’t already registered, visit the website or contact Taylor Lindsey at 614-481-6202 or tlindsey@grandviewheights.org 

Special thanks to the program’s sponsors: the Grandview Heights Public Library, Primrose Grandview, Cub Shrub, Great Clips, Peabody Papers, Doggie Day Spa and Capital City Gardens.

 

Tuesday Top 5 is a weekly update from Mayor Ray DeGraw and the City of Grandview Heights. For more information, visit GrandviewHeights.org. 

Sign up here to get text or email alerts with the latest news from the City of Grandview Heights: https://www.grandviewheights.org/list.aspx?ListID=261

 The Tuesday Top 5: March 12, 2019

Welcome to the Tuesday Top 5! Your source for the latest info on what is going on in Grandview Heights

1.City begins Safe Routes to School Projects

The Grandview Heights Service Department will begin several projects this week to make walking and riding bicycles to school safer before the start of the 2019-2020 school year.

20190219_145807(0)

The projects slated during the next few weeks consist of:

1.    Share the road bike markings on West First Avenue from Cambridge Boulevard to Virginia Avenue; 

2.    Installing flashing school zone lights on West First just east of Virginia Ave on eastbound side of First and east of Oxley on the westbound side.  

3.    Installing flashing crosswalk lights over West First at Virginia; and 

4.    Installing flashing lights on Oxley just north of Robert Louis Stevenson Elementary between Hilo Lane and Parkway Drive.

5.    Bike rake at the middle school.

The City had identified these projects several years ago in hopes of gaining some federal Safe Routes to School funding. That funding just came through in recent months.

The expectation is these projects will help improve driver awareness and improve safety at Stevenson. I wrote about just a few weeks ago.    


2. Grandview Crossing Cleared for Redevelopment

The City could see the first projects emerge from the former Kaplin landfill that once stretched along Dublin Road from Grandview Avenue to Columbus’ water treatment plan by spring 2020, after key Grandview Heights City Council votes on March 4th.

I am pleased to report Council approved, in a 6-0 vote, the Community Reinvestment Area legislation necessary to offer developer Wagenbrenner Development and its Gallas Zadeh Development partners a 50 percent, 15-year tax abatement on the planned residential, office and hotel projects. It also approved non-school tax incremental financing legislation for planned public improvements as an incentive for their investment into the Grandview Heights portion of the development.

Wagenbrenner Development expects to begin underground utility work this spring as weather permits. The first projects built on the 15.9 acres in the City and additional 37 acres located in Columbus will likely a parking garage along the rail lines marketing the northern boundary of Grandview Crossing as well as the first of the residential buildings planned throughout the development site.

The portion of the project inside Grandview Heights will feature 50,000 square feet of office and 50,000 square feet of retail, a 200-key hotel and a rental housing project of 250 units geared toward seniors.

In January the Council approved the rezoning of the Grandview section of the project from light industrial to Planned Unit Development zoning that permits a mix of uses. It also approved the City entering into an economic development agreement with the developers at that time.

3. Kaplin Landfill Redevelopment Decades in the Making

I wanted to offer bit more perspective on the Grandview Crossing site that has taken so long to become a community asset.

20190104_160919

That stretch of land from the site of the demolished Knights Inn to the regional water plant became a landfill after years as a quarry operation. The landfill closed in 1967 after accepting the last loads of solid waste and construction debris. Weeds and trees grew on the landfill for more than 50 years.

Continental Real Estate Cos. briefly considered an office and retail project there in the early 2000s. After that effort failed, the Toledo family trust that owned the property decided in 2002 to put the property up for sale.

A second developer, Bear Creek Capital, a few years later, planned a Walmart Supercenter- or Home Depot-anchored retail development on the site, but legal issues overshadowing an environmental consultant tied to the project in late 2006, combined with signs of a softening retail development market ahead of the 2008-2009 recession, scuttled that prospect Bear Creek had dubbed Grandview Station.

Wagenbrenner became interested in the site in late 2011 as ripe for mixed-use development as it obtained state funding for cleaning up the site. By 2016, it had switched its focus to construction to a 350,000-square-foot retail project, but the shrinking demand for brick-and-mortar retail space again prompted a retreat to a mixed-use project.

This project, which is mostly office and residential based promises to improve the southern gateway into our community and provide, in addition to office and residential, retail, a park and entertainment options as well employment opportunities for residents.

4. City Plans 2019 Road Repairs

The City service department has received three bids for the repaving of several streets and alleyways as part of its 2019 streets program.

Bids were open on March 7th.

The bids from Strawser Paving Co., Columbus Asphalt Paving Inc.  and Decker Construction ranged from $637,857 to $685,391, or well below the engineer’s estimate of $750,000.
The road sections slated for repaving in 2019 are:
  • Glendale Avenue between Mulford Avenue and Second Avenue;
  • Mulford between Grandview Avenue and Glendale
  • Timberman Road between Burr Avenue and Mulford;
  • Elwood Avenue between Goodale and Bluff Avenue; and
  • Westwood Avenue between First and Bluff.
Section of alleys slated for work this year are:
  • Between Thomas Ave. and Oxley Road just south of Mulford;
  • Between Thomas and Oxley just north of Goodale;
  • Between Glendale and Avondale between West First and Haines avenues; 
  • Between Glenn and Westwood avenues just south of Third Avenue; and
  • The intersection of alleys between Elmwood and Westwood just north of First.

The projects as part of the recent bids also include widening the pavement for pedestrians and bicycles along the east edge of Grandview Avenue between Goodale and City Hall.

City Council, during its March 4th meeting, voted 6-0 to authorize Service Department spending up to $100,000 for full-depth spot paving projects to fix potholes and sections of crumbling pavement created during this winter’s unexpectedly damaging freeze-and-thaw weather events this year. 
The recent bids include contingency rates for these repairs.

5. Celebrate Spring with the Leprechaun Scavenger Hunt this Saturday

The Grandview Heights Parks and Recreation Department will host a St. Patrick’s Day themed Leprechaun Hunt on Saturday, March 16 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

lep sa

The fun begins at the Wyman Woods shelter house where participants will get their first clue as they visit various local businesses. Each business will offer goodies and have an activity for those on the hunt to complete before using that clue to find the next location.

There is a 150-person limit so if you haven’t already registered, visit the website or contact Taylor Lindsey at 614-481-6202 or tlindsey@grandviewheights.org 

Special thanks to the program’s sponsors: the Grandview Heights Public Library, Primrose Grandview, Cub Shrub, Great Clips, Peabody Papers, Doggie Day Spa and Capital City Gardens.

 

Tuesday Top 5 is a weekly update from Mayor Ray DeGraw and the City of Grandview Heights. For more information, visit GrandviewHeights.org. 

Sign up here to get text or email alerts with the latest news from the City of Grandview Heights: https://www.grandviewheights.org/list.aspx?ListID=261

 The Tuesday Top 5: March 12, 2019

Welcome to the Tuesday Top 5! Your source for the latest info on what is going on in Grandview Heights

1.City begins Safe Routes to School Projects

The Grandview Heights Service Department will begin several projects this week to make walking and riding bicycles to school safer before the start of the 2019-2020 school year.

20190219_145807(0)

The projects slated during the next few weeks consist of:

1.    Share the road bike markings on West First Avenue from Cambridge Boulevard to Virginia Avenue; 

2.    Installing flashing school zone lights on West First just east of Virginia Ave on eastbound side of First and east of Oxley on the westbound side.  

3.    Installing flashing crosswalk lights over West First at Virginia; and 

4.    Installing flashing lights on Oxley just north of Robert Louis Stevenson Elementary between Hilo Lane and Parkway Drive.

5.    Bike rake at the middle school.

The City had identified these projects several years ago in hopes of gaining some federal Safe Routes to School funding. That funding just came through in recent months.

The expectation is these projects will help improve driver awareness and improve safety at Stevenson. I wrote about just a few weeks ago.    


2. Grandview Crossing Cleared for Redevelopment

The City could see the first projects emerge from the former Kaplin landfill that once stretched along Dublin Road from Grandview Avenue to Columbus’ water treatment plan by spring 2020, after key Grandview Heights City Council votes on March 4th.

I am pleased to report Council approved, in a 6-0 vote, the Community Reinvestment Area legislation necessary to offer developer Wagenbrenner Development and its Gallas Zadeh Development partners a 50 percent, 15-year tax abatement on the planned residential, office and hotel projects. It also approved non-school tax incremental financing legislation for planned public improvements as an incentive for their investment into the Grandview Heights portion of the development.

Wagenbrenner Development expects to begin underground utility work this spring as weather permits. The first projects built on the 15.9 acres in the City and additional 37 acres located in Columbus will likely a parking garage along the rail lines marketing the northern boundary of Grandview Crossing as well as the first of the residential buildings planned throughout the development site.

The portion of the project inside Grandview Heights will feature 50,000 square feet of office and 50,000 square feet of retail, a 200-key hotel and a rental housing project of 250 units geared toward seniors.

In January the Council approved the rezoning of the Grandview section of the project from light industrial to Planned Unit Development zoning that permits a mix of uses. It also approved the City entering into an economic development agreement with the developers at that time.

3. Kaplin Landfill Redevelopment Decades in the Making

I wanted to offer bit more perspective on the Grandview Crossing site that has taken so long to become a community asset.

20190104_160919

That stretch of land from the site of the demolished Knights Inn to the regional water plant became a landfill after years as a quarry operation. The landfill closed in 1967 after accepting the last loads of solid waste and construction debris. Weeds and trees grew on the landfill for more than 50 years.

Continental Real Estate Cos. briefly considered an office and retail project there in the early 2000s. After that effort failed, the Toledo family trust that owned the property decided in 2002 to put the property up for sale.

A second developer, Bear Creek Capital, a few years later, planned a Walmart Supercenter- or Home Depot-anchored retail development on the site, but legal issues overshadowing an environmental consultant tied to the project in late 2006, combined with signs of a softening retail development market ahead of the 2008-2009 recession, scuttled that prospect Bear Creek had dubbed Grandview Station.

Wagenbrenner became interested in the site in late 2011 as ripe for mixed-use development as it obtained state funding for cleaning up the site. By 2016, it had switched its focus to construction to a 350,000-square-foot retail project, but the shrinking demand for brick-and-mortar retail space again prompted a retreat to a mixed-use project.

This project, which is mostly office and residential based promises to improve the southern gateway into our community and provide, in addition to office and residential, retail, a park and entertainment options as well employment opportunities for residents.

4. City Plans 2019 Road Repairs

The City service department has received three bids for the repaving of several streets and alleyways as part of its 2019 streets program.

Bids were open on March 7th.

The bids from Strawser Paving Co., Columbus Asphalt Paving Inc.  and Decker Construction ranged from $637,857 to $685,391, or well below the engineer’s estimate of $750,000.
The road sections slated for repaving in 2019 are:
  • Glendale Avenue between Mulford Avenue and Second Avenue;
  • Mulford between Grandview Avenue and Glendale
  • Timberman Road between Burr Avenue and Mulford;
  • Elwood Avenue between Goodale and Bluff Avenue; and
  • Westwood Avenue between First and Bluff.
Section of alleys slated for work this year are:
  • Between Thomas Ave. and Oxley Road just south of Mulford;
  • Between Thomas and Oxley just north of Goodale;
  • Between Glendale and Avondale between West First and Haines avenues; 
  • Between Glenn and Westwood avenues just south of Third Avenue; and
  • The intersection of alleys between Elmwood and Westwood just north of First.

The projects as part of the recent bids also include widening the pavement for pedestrians and bicycles along the east edge of Grandview Avenue between Goodale and City Hall.

City Council, during its March 4th meeting, voted 6-0 to authorize Service Department spending up to $100,000 for full-depth spot paving projects to fix potholes and sections of crumbling pavement created during this winter’s unexpectedly damaging freeze-and-thaw weather events this year. 
The recent bids include contingency rates for these repairs.

5. Celebrate Spring with the Leprechaun Scavenger Hunt this Saturday

The Grandview Heights Parks and Recreation Department will host a St. Patrick’s Day themed Leprechaun Hunt on Saturday, March 16 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

lep sa

The fun begins at the Wyman Woods shelter house where participants will get their first clue as they visit various local businesses. Each business will offer goodies and have an activity for those on the hunt to complete before using that clue to find the next location.

There is a 150-person limit so if you haven’t already registered, visit the website or contact Taylor Lindsey at 614-481-6202 or tlindsey@grandviewheights.org 

Special thanks to the program’s sponsors: the Grandview Heights Public Library, Primrose Grandview, Cub Shrub, Great Clips, Peabody Papers, Doggie Day Spa and Capital City Gardens.

 

Tuesday Top 5 is a weekly update from Mayor Ray DeGraw and the City of Grandview Heights. For more information, visit GrandviewHeights.org. 

Sign up here to get text or email alerts with the latest news from the City of Grandview Heights: https://www.grandviewheights.org/list.aspx?ListID=261

 The Tuesday Top 5: March 12, 2019

Welcome to the Tuesday Top 5! Your source for the latest info on what is going on in Grandview Heights

1.City begins Safe Routes to School Projects

The Grandview Heights Service Department will begin several projects this week to make walking and riding bicycles to school safer before the start of the 2019-2020 school year.

20190219_145807(0)

The projects slated during the next few weeks consist of:

1.    Share the road bike markings on West First Avenue from Cambridge Boulevard to Virginia Avenue; 

2.    Installing flashing school zone lights on West First just east of Virginia Ave on eastbound side of First and east of Oxley on the westbound side.  

3.    Installing flashing crosswalk lights over West First at Virginia; and 

4.    Installing flashing lights on Oxley just north of Robert Louis Stevenson Elementary between Hilo Lane and Parkway Drive.

5.    Bike rake at the middle school.

The City had identified these projects several years ago in hopes of gaining some federal Safe Routes to School funding. That funding just came through in recent months.

The expectation is these projects will help improve driver awareness and improve safety at Stevenson. I wrote about just a few weeks ago.    


2. Grandview Crossing Cleared for Redevelopment

The City could see the first projects emerge from the former Kaplin landfill that once stretched along Dublin Road from Grandview Avenue to Columbus’ water treatment plan by spring 2020, after key Grandview Heights City Council votes on March 4th.

I am pleased to report Council approved, in a 6-0 vote, the Community Reinvestment Area legislation necessary to offer developer Wagenbrenner Development and its Gallas Zadeh Development partners a 50 percent, 15-year tax abatement on the planned residential, office and hotel projects. It also approved non-school tax incremental financing legislation for planned public improvements as an incentive for their investment into the Grandview Heights portion of the development.

Wagenbrenner Development expects to begin underground utility work this spring as weather permits. The first projects built on the 15.9 acres in the City and additional 37 acres located in Columbus will likely a parking garage along the rail lines marketing the northern boundary of Grandview Crossing as well as the first of the residential buildings planned throughout the development site.

The portion of the project inside Grandview Heights will feature 50,000 square feet of office and 50,000 square feet of retail, a 200-key hotel and a rental housing project of 250 units geared toward seniors.

In January the Council approved the rezoning of the Grandview section of the project from light industrial to Planned Unit Development zoning that permits a mix of uses. It also approved the City entering into an economic development agreement with the developers at that time.

3. Kaplin Landfill Redevelopment Decades in the Making

I wanted to offer bit more perspective on the Grandview Crossing site that has taken so long to become a community asset.

20190104_160919

That stretch of land from the site of the demolished Knights Inn to the regional water plant became a landfill after years as a quarry operation. The landfill closed in 1967 after accepting the last loads of solid waste and construction debris. Weeds and trees grew on the landfill for more than 50 years.

Continental Real Estate Cos. briefly considered an office and retail project there in the early 2000s. After that effort failed, the Toledo family trust that owned the property decided in 2002 to put the property up for sale.

A second developer, Bear Creek Capital, a few years later, planned a Walmart Supercenter- or Home Depot-anchored retail development on the site, but legal issues overshadowing an environmental consultant tied to the project in late 2006, combined with signs of a softening retail development market ahead of the 2008-2009 recession, scuttled that prospect Bear Creek had dubbed Grandview Station.

Wagenbrenner became interested in the site in late 2011 as ripe for mixed-use development as it obtained state funding for cleaning up the site. By 2016, it had switched its focus to construction to a 350,000-square-foot retail project, but the shrinking demand for brick-and-mortar retail space again prompted a retreat to a mixed-use project.

This project, which is mostly office and residential based promises to improve the southern gateway into our community and provide, in addition to office and residential, retail, a park and entertainment options as well employment opportunities for residents.

4. City Plans 2019 Road Repairs

The City service department has received three bids for the repaving of several streets and alleyways as part of its 2019 streets program.

Bids were open on March 7th.

The bids from Strawser Paving Co., Columbus Asphalt Paving Inc.  and Decker Construction ranged from $637,857 to $685,391, or well below the engineer’s estimate of $750,000.
The road sections slated for repaving in 2019 are:
  • Glendale Avenue between Mulford Avenue and Second Avenue;
  • Mulford between Grandview Avenue and Glendale
  • Timberman Road between Burr Avenue and Mulford;
  • Elwood Avenue between Goodale and Bluff Avenue; and
  • Westwood Avenue between First and Bluff.
Section of alleys slated for work this year are:
  • Between Thomas Ave. and Oxley Road just south of Mulford;
  • Between Thomas and Oxley just north of Goodale;
  • Between Glendale and Avondale between West First and Haines avenues; 
  • Between Glenn and Westwood avenues just south of Third Avenue; and
  • The intersection of alleys between Elmwood and Westwood just north of First.

The projects as part of the recent bids also include widening the pavement for pedestrians and bicycles along the east edge of Grandview Avenue between Goodale and City Hall.

City Council, during its March 4th meeting, voted 6-0 to authorize Service Department spending up to $100,000 for full-depth spot paving projects to fix potholes and sections of crumbling pavement created during this winter’s unexpectedly damaging freeze-and-thaw weather events this year. 
The recent bids include contingency rates for these repairs.

5. Celebrate Spring with the Leprechaun Scavenger Hunt this Saturday

The Grandview Heights Parks and Recreation Department will host a St. Patrick’s Day themed Leprechaun Hunt on Saturday, March 16 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

lep sa

The fun begins at the Wyman Woods shelter house where participants will get their first clue as they visit various local businesses. Each business will offer goodies and have an activity for those on the hunt to complete before using that clue to find the next location.

There is a 150-person limit so if you haven’t already registered, visit the website or contact Taylor Lindsey at 614-481-6202 or tlindsey@grandviewheights.org 

Special thanks to the program’s sponsors: the Grandview Heights Public Library, Primrose Grandview, Cub Shrub, Great Clips, Peabody Papers, Doggie Day Spa and Capital City Gardens.

 

Tuesday Top 5 is a weekly update from Mayor Ray DeGraw and the City of Grandview Heights. For more information, visit GrandviewHeights.org. 

Sign up here to get text or email alerts with the latest news from the City of Grandview Heights: https://www.grandviewheights.org/list.aspx?ListID=261
 The Tuesday Top 5: March 12, 2019

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Mar 11

Final Invitation for City of Address

Posted on March 11, 2019 at 5:47 PM by Laura Oldham

Final invitation to get details on the progress Grandview Heights made in 2018 during the State of the City address.

One last time, I’d like to invite the residents and businesses of Grandview Heights to attend the State of the City address slated for the evening of Tuesday, March 12th.

Early each year for the last 15 years I have had the responsibility to report on conditions in our community. In early 2004, things looked bleak for the community after the closing of the Big Bear office and warehouse complex. How things have changed, as the shuttered Big Bear property and surrounding under-utilized industrial buildings have given way to a vibrant mixed-use development as a major employment center, residential neighborhood and commercial district.This year, we will take some time to recognize some of the people that were instrumental in our success, review 2018, and look forward to critical improvements and projects on the agenda for 2019.

I would encourage residents and those with businesses in the City to join me, members of City Council, those who lead our City Departments and other community leaders at The Grand Event Center. Networking will begin at 6 p.m. at the facility between the Courtyard by Marriott and the Hofbrauhaus at 820 Goodale Blvd, followed by the address at 6:30 p.m.

I look forward to seeing you there. 

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